All posts by wcrx1234

The Award-winning student run radio station of Columbia College Chicago.

Graduation Jitters

By Sara Gunn

As news of my pending graduation from college begins to get out to family and friends, I’m constantly asked two of the most simple questions that call for some very difficult answers.

  • What are your plans after graduation?
  • Are you excited to be graduating?

Before I attempt to answer these questions let me state some facts. According to the American Psychological Association’s Stress in America Survey, millennial’s are the country’s most stressed out generation due to the fact that we face high college tuition costs and exorbitant student loan debt compared to past generations.   There is also stiff competition for jobs as we enter the work force.

So is graduating from college really a reason to celebrate?

The best way I can describe my college experience is to compare it to going on a road trip for the first time.  When I first got to leave home after attending a community college for two years I was excited, anxious AND maybe a little nervous.  As I started my journey and got the hang of the quote “college life” it became a smooth ride, with a built-in GPS for when I got lost. Granted there were a few speed bumps during the journey but I experienced some once in a lifetime memories during the long ride.  I have now reached my final destination, graduation.

As graduation day approaches, I feel like everything is changing.  The thought of leaving behind my college days and entering “the real world” becomes a scary feeling. This is the first time I find myself day dreaming a lot more and constantly asking myself “what’s next in my life?” In high school, there were guidance counselors and parents around to help you decide your next step. Now as college comes to an end I start to realize that what once was a smooth ride down the street is now riddled with pot holes, the speed bumps are starting to become road blocks and the passengers that once filled my car are starting to be replaced with silence.

The pressure to find a job in my field before the 6-month grace period on my student loans will be soon approaching and the mere thought of those loans creep into my head everyday.  I also can’t seem to shake the possibility that I might never, ever work in my field and all of the classroom work, internships and projects that I did was all for nothing.  Even though I feel that my college curriculum prepared me for my field and all of my instructors shared their wisdom and provided me with whatever I needed, I still ask myself, am I ready? Can I do this? Will I make it?

How many of you soon to be college graduates feel the same way? I’d love for you to respond or call me during my show every Tuesday from 11am until 3pm.

Soon to be a college graduate,

Sara Gunn

Bathroom Break Required

by Alex Arata

I’ve never been a terribly confident person. Now, sure, if my close friends ask me for the millionth time to do my tried and true Alanis Morissette impression, I’m not going to waiver. Compare that, however, to getting up on a stage and performing, or introducing myself to a classroom full of strangers, or co-anchoring an entire election night’s worth of coverage, and you’ve got a situation that’ll leave my hands shaking. Despite all this, I actually somehow put myself in that last position. On real, live radio, I signed up to co-host five hours’ worth of impromptu discussions, candid interviews, and–oh God, the horror–ad libbing. In my mind, I’d be facing my worst fears–or so I thought.

Okay, so everyone has an opinion, or at least most of us do. I am particularly noted as commonly having strong ones. However, I worked hard the night of the election to remain unbiased. I tried not to code my language or reveal something in the tone of my voice, and in the early stages of the night, I thought I was doing a pretty good job. It wasn’t like the candidate I truly and honestly feared, was going to win… right?

Wrong, apparently.

I learned a lot more than I had expected whilst covering this election. And one of those things is sometimes, if what you’re covering is going to make you lose your cool, you simply have to go to the bathroom on one of your fleeting breaks, have a three minute cry, and then get back to work. This was a valuable lesson for me, and one I plan to hold on to. After a half hour, my nerves were overcome, but my emotions were another story altogether. What I took away from this experience that night is that, if I can just hold it for a little while (and keep holding, and keep holding even longer if I must), there’s nothing wrong with an emotional release–as long as I still get the job done.

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Election Night Anchors starting to the far right:  Alex Arata, Dylan Buchweitz and National Desk anchor Maggie McCoy.

How the “Go Blue” State Went Red

By Maggie McCoy

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I had always thought it would be exciting to live in a swing state, to have the whole country look to your state on the night of the election. I thought it would thrilling to know that your vote, every vote, matters in this race. But what I learned in this election is that it isn’t fun to be from a swing state. It’s actually the most terrifying thing in the world.

I grew up in Michigan, a state that in my memory has always voted blue. I thought I knew my state. I thought that there was no way a Republican candidate could win our 16 electoral votes. I laughed at anyone who predicted that Michigan would be a state to watch on election night. But as I write this, President-elect Donald Trump has  just been declared the winner of our state. A whole 20 days after election night, the votes have finally been counted.

I view my state differently now. I question who I know that might have voted for Donald Trump. I wonder what drew so many people, people who had similar experiences to me, to this candidate. My whole life, I’ve always seen Republican states as a faraway places; but now I am living in one. It’s a fact I couldn’t believe on election night. As the numbers came in, I kept telling myself, “They haven’t counted Wayne county, Washtenaw county is only 30% in, and Oakland county is always late.”  Michigan wasn’t officially declared on November 8th, so I was able to convince myself that Trump didn’t win my home state. But he did. On November 28th, Donald Trump was declared the winner of Michigan with a 10,704 vote margin.

Now I know my wishes for being in a swing state were misguided. There is nothing exciting about living in uncertainty. There is no glamour in not knowing what your next-door neighbor is truly thinking.  I would gladly give up any excitement of being in a swing state to get my boring true-blue state back.

To learn more about how Michigan voted Republican, read here: http://www.mlive.com/politics/index.ssf/2016/11/how_did_donald_trump_win_michi.html